Health

We’re proud bimbos who’re hellbent on creating a brand new girls’s motion


Within the phrases of the OG bimbo: That’s scorching.

TikToker Chrissy Chlapecka has introduced again extra than simply Paris Hilton-esque micro-mini skirts and bleach blonde hair – she and her fellow Gen Z’ers are proud “bimbos,” too.

The Chicago native, who’s garnered 4.3 million followers on TikTok, frequently posts shamelessly scantily-clad movies dolled up in head-to-toe pink to hype up her “bimbos-in-training,” persuade them to dump their boyfriends and reclaim the time period by embracing overt sexuality

“It’s time to start being yourself if you want to dye your hair pink,” she declares in an intentional upskirt clip with 2.5 million views. “Life is short, nothing matters. Kiss that girl, get revenge on your ex, punt him into the sun, steal that man’s credit card info. Who cares!”

Her titillating hashtag, #BimboTok, has clearly impressed a legion of women, garnering over 74 million views from wishful wannabes. Offshoots like #BimboTikTok and #Bimbofication have racked up one other 500-million-plus views.

“It’s just my art form,” Chlapecka, 22, informed The Submit.

“I kind of see myself as TikTok’s older sister, who gives you silly bits of advice and wants to hype you up and wants you to embrace all the beautiful parts of yourself,” she continued. “Whether that’s your hyper-femininity, your bimbo wisdom in the way that I present it or however somebody wants to in their own way. Wearing the outfits I do makes me feel like the most authentic, beautiful version of myself.”

Chrissy Chlapecka lounging in pink
Chlapecka tells her followers — who she calls “girlies” — to look scorching and “slay.”
Courtesy Chrissy Chlapecka

For Fiona Fairbarin, being a bimbo takes an easier tune: Simply leaning into excessive self-love and, in fact, being the sexiest model of herself.

In a now-viral TikTok video with more than 688,000 views, 19-year-old Fairbairn crafted the unofficial bimbo manifesto to information the bimbo military. Titled “Rules for Bimbofication,” the Toronto-native satirically advises aspiring fellow floozy mates to cease fact-checking, solely concentrate on their appears to be like and to not critically suppose.

Her video acquired a refrain of applause – and laughter from its barely satirical tone – from girls on the app, calling it “therapy.”

Whereas the video was in jest, the message nonetheless rings true: At its core, bimboism is a “self-love movement” for a lot of girls. Fairbarin stated the so-called trampy pattern is “just about being in your own world and being okay with people underestimating you.”

“Knowing yourself and almost being obsessed with yourself, dating yourself – I feel like that’s the route to actual self-love,” Fairbairn, who has over 171,000 followers on TikTok, informed The Submit. “When you kind of exaggerate it, it will actually translate into real self-love. And when you have so much self-love, you’re calm, you don’t overthink so much.”

Fiona Fairbairn
Fairbairn believes being a bimbo isn’t about how the appears to be like — it’s about being assured.
Courtesy Fiona Fairbairn

However don’t underestimate these brazen broads: Whereas the garments and angle pay homage to the times of Playboy’s Holly Madison, these self-proclaimed bimbos have far more than air between their ears.

“I think a lot of people really underestimate the true intelligence that I have,” Chlapecka, who constructed her TikTok bimbo dynasty practically two years in the past, stated. “My intelligence comes from emotional intelligence, connection and being able to communicate and talk to people the way they deserve to be…I think that can totally get overlooked.”

Chrissy Chlapecka in sparkly dress
Chlapecka offers with damaging feedback by means of jokes, not caring how individuals understand her as a bimbo.
Courtesy Chrissy Chlapecka

The term “bimbo” hasn’t always been so comforting – see the “holy Trinity” of social pariahs Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan and Britney Spears throughout their “Bimbo Summit” heyday simply over a decade in the past. Whereas the pattern percolated in 2017 when grownup star Alicia Amira based The Bimbo Movement to empower girls, these Gen Z gals, who got here to maturity in a post-#MeToo world, are binging it mainstream as soon as once more — and are hell-bent on altering notion as soon as and for all.

“It’s reclaiming hyper-femininity to not be seen as something that is inherently or innately vapid and something that should be looked down upon,” stated Syrena, who goes by her username FauxRich.

Syrena, who boasts over 122,000 followers on TikTok, stated that being a girly woman is usually “looked down upon as something that’s just so frivolous and stupid,” however she chalks all of it as much as systemic “misogyny.”

Britney Spears, Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton on the evening of the "Bimbo Summit" in 2006.
Britney Spears, Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton on the night of the “Bimbo Summit” in 2006.
BEN/DEAN/GABO/BAUER-GRIFFIN.COM

“To reclaim that is powerful,” the 23-year-old stated.

Regardless of being enrolled in accelerated programs in highschool, Syrena stated individuals used to make enjoyable of her voice for sounding “stupid.” However “ridding herself of the shackles” changing into a self-proclaimed bimbo and ridding of the notion of what makes somebody “smart” gave her liberation.

“As I’ve evolved into more of an adult woman, I dressed like what makes me feel really comfortable and what inherently makes me look at myself in the mirror and go like, ‘Oh, yeah, I would totally date myself,’” stated Syrena.

Syrena
Syrena, often known as FauxRich on social media, was bullied for the way her voice sounded.
Courtesy Syrena

The negativity surrounding bimboism is one thing Chlapecka is conversant in, too, however she takes the stigma in stride, even making reaction videos to their “funny” remarks.

“[They’re] just people who are angry at somebody who is openly queer and openly loving themselves and being a bimbo,” Chlapecka stated. “Wearing the outfits I do makes me feel like the most authentic, beautiful version of myself.”

“They’re just mad at that person, me, for existing,” she added.

Fairbairn ignores the noise, although, and strides with satisfaction as a bimbo.

“I just realized [when you’re] focusing on yourself and being your best self and being the hottest version of yourself,” she stated, “you don’t have enough time to think about what other people are thinking about you.”



Source link