Games

PlayStation Stars apparently offers “precedence” buyer help to prime members




PlayStation Stars has just launched in Asia, but some players are unhappy that top members are reportedly being given “priority” support.


First announced back in July, PlayStation Stars has now launched in Asia this week, with the confirmation that the loyalty program will come to North America and Europe in October. However, as reported by VGC, top members of the program are supposedly being given priority when it comes to customer support, which a number of players aren’t happy with.


PlayStation Stars apparently has a four tier system that players can progress through by purchasing games and earning trophies. The fourth and highest tier requires you to buy four full-price games on the PlayStation and accrue 128 rare trophies. If a player manages to do this, they’ll net a commemorative collectible, and according to Sony, “when contacting PlayStation Customer Support,” tier four players “will be given priority in the chat order.”


Japanese site Automaton pointed out this bonus on Twitter, which a number of Twitter users expressed frustration at. “Customer support must be equal,” said Twitter user akutarosu (translations via VGC). “There are people who only like a few titles and play them, and there are gamers who can’t afford money or time.”


Another Twitter user, yossy_44, said that they “don’t think it’s a good idea to prioritise customer support. I bought a PS5 just for Final Fantasy 16 – is it okay for someone like that to be put aside for later?”


If you hadn’t heard of PlayStation Stars before this point, it’s a new loyalty program effort from Sony that offers players two types of rewards to earn. Players can earn loyalty points, which they can then spend to get PSN wallet funds, digital collectibles, and select PlayStation Store products. Those digital collectibles are the other thing players can earn through completing various campaigns and activities (they aren’t NFTs, don’t worry).

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